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Chasing Men Who Stare at Arrays | Catherine Lathwell's APL/A/J/K/Q Film Diaries

A celebration! 50th years, the founding of IP Sharp Associates

November 14, 1970

Financial Post November 14, 1970

Happy 2014!  It’s April and 2014 still sounds astonishing.  More remarkable still, IP Sharp was founded 50 Years ago. Although APL was not immediately part of the plan in 1964, it would be shortly. In the ensuing years, many array programmers and young business people from around the world cut their baby teeth at this hub of Canadian innovation.

The rest, as they say, is History.

A celebration is in order and on behalf of the steadfast organisers, I’d like to draw your attention to a what promises to be a very special night in Toronto:

Keep the Date! October 4th, 2014, for a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Founding of I. P. Sharp Associates: A reunion party is being planned in Toronto in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Founding of I. P. Sharp Associates in the Fall of 1964!!! Saturday October 4, 2014, 4:00pm to 8:00pm at the Panorama Room, Manulife Centre, Toronto with cocktail buffet & cash bar Details are posted and will be updated at http://ipsa50.ca/ 

And now, from the archives… for every beginning there is an end… and a new beginning.

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Against the odds, APL’s logarithm wins

APL film logo

You probably noticed there were two choices on the voting ballot for the APL film logo, and logarithm wasn’t one of them. In fact, the APL symbol for rotate lead with 71% before we closed the poll – You might ask: What happened?

The first thing that happened immediately was a strong constituency lobbying for the APL symbol lamp.  Lamp is the symbol which denotes a comment in APL, and on the surface this is an obvious choice for a film logo.  In fact, lamp was on the list of possibilities presented to Cris Jaw, our visionary leader in the design process. While lamp simply isn’t badass enough for me, we heard the passion in the voices of our critics.   The discourse opened the door to the possibility that there might be a better choice than the two up for vote.  So, when APL’s logarithm was put forward later in the discussion which followed we had already considered the idea of not going with the vote.

The most compelling reason for going with APL’s symbol logarithm is:

It it denotes a function for which conventional mathematical notation does not have a good symbol (see Roger Hui’s, My Favorite APL Symbol 2013).

What better reminder that Kenneth E. Iverson’s vision was always turned to the future than an APL symbol to remind us that computer languages aren’t perfect, and neither is mathematical notation.   In the continuum of human progress, we’re not done yet.

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Happy New Year! 2013!

I’m a bit tired from last night’s festivities, but I didn’t want to let another day pass by without a quick hello and a brief update.  Right now marks the midway point for this epic filmmaking journey, which puts us on target for our intended 2016 release of the documentary.   Yes.  This is long range planning and there are some important and exciting milestones planned for 2014.  Are you ready?

NewYear1As for 2012, we talked to a lot of people in the community and did many research interviews. Everyone is doing a wonderful job working with us in what is a completely intrusive process.  Thank you, thank you.

I confess to being a particularly poor commentator this year and a few people are still waiting to hear about my trip to Florida to visit Ian and Audrey Sharp way back in August. So, to ring in the new year,  here are a few images from the trip.NewYear7

Ian and Audrey welcomed me into their home and graciously let me root through their collection of  I. P. Sharp Associates memorabilia and turn their otherwise pristine living room into a movie set.  This is where the news clipping from Olive’s 1965 diary came from.

It was a pleasure to spend a week with the Sharps.  They have a beautiful place near the water and interrupted their busy schedule of tenis and volunteering to show me around.  Ian does Meals on Wheels and Audrey performs hearing tests on new born babies.  And it was hot, hot, hot… They live in a hot place! Hot, it is almost impossible to imagine in snowy Toronto January!

And there is a whole other thesis lurking under all of this about Canadian technology entrepreneurialship. But that is a story for a different day.

NewYear2

Back in the APL FILMS office, we are poised and ready to launch a big publicity campaign in 2014. We’ve been working hard coming up with the concept and final designs for the logo.  It’s now down to choosing between two versions.  We’re stumped so we’ll put it to a vote.   The voting poll is all set-up and waiting for us to pull the tigger on Monday.  Stay tuned.  We need your help. This is the first of a few important steps moving forward.

Happy New Year, everyone!

 

 

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CHM Honours Falkoff’s Birthday

Incidentally, Mr. Adin Falkoff’s entry in the CHM’s This Day in History was added a few years ago.  It is extra fun to see the legendary collaborators Falkoff and Iverson recognized together with birthdays two days apart.  My apologies for not posting this yesterday!

December 19. 1921

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Computer History Museum Honours Iverson’s Birthday

Happy Birthday Dr Iverson.

CHM

 

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My hero! Shustek, APL/360 & 10 Years Later

It took Len Shustek, chairman of the board of trustees of the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California, 10 years to get permission from IBM to publish the APL/360 source code.  Not only has he gone and done it, he’s also written a wonderful companion explanatory essay to go along with its publication. Please see: The APL Programming Language Source Code

Congratulations, Len!  Thank you for your persistence.

(Special thanks to the ever vigilant Christian Langreiter for scooping this story)

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From Olive’s IPSA diary – 1965

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In the Beginning

Well…  It looks like the short video I am showing next week in Toronto will contrast how both APL and J got started.  This audience already understands the connection between J and APL and will get a little more depth and a little less closure.

Eric Iverson talks about how J started and Dr Brooks talks about where APL began.

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Going nova: Kx princess denouement 

The  intricacies of this APL story, a story of epic proportions, with richness, contradictions, irony, paradox and most importantly brilliant characters provides everything a storyteller could hope for.  This is the perfect story.  Except…well, a slightly less ephemeral subject would be easier to visualize, but never mind.

The dashing Pierre Kovalev and Oleg Finkelshteyn (left) take after their mentor, Arthur Whitney and are men of few words, big brains and deep hearts.  They are working on performance optimization, a field where those trained in Array Programming Language thinking have an advantage, a mental edge.  Seriously, Professor, take note.

The up and coming Peter Bell, Carlos Butler and Tisean Jeffers (right) from Loughborough University are all bright stars ready for action with poise and affability which indicates there are great things in their future reminiscent of APL’s Brat Pack. Peter, by the way, gets extra points for recognizing me from YouTube, which means, folks, he is out there exploring and paying attention.  Go easy and think about what this says about him, rather than me.

Fintan Quill (left) radiates a calm competence with just a hint of characteristically Irish charm. He’s a bit like Simon, although Simon isn’t Irish.  Fintan has a long history with Array Programming and recently joined the Kx team in New York. Lucky Kx!

And if I really WERE a Princess, and to be candid, I’m certainly not. And in actuality, I get along better with Queens than Princesses, but if I were a Princess, I would give David Katz (below) my scarf, any day.

He has the ultimate, you just never know with APL, story. Having written his Master’s thesis on APL a relatively long time ago, and then finding not much APL action in Michigan back in the day, he went on to more mainstream  Software Engineering.  And then, several years later his resume was plucked out of the pile because of that APL thesis.  AND that’s why I had the pleasure of meeting him in Ireland.  Incidentally, he half volunteered and was half drafted to help me with the next phase of this project, which is getting it financed.

Where are all the women?  Well, it turns out that Janet, Victoria, Alla and Holly are all running around faster than the speed of light keeping everyone in business.   So far, I haven’t caught them sitting still long enough to grab a picture.  But they’re there.  You can bet on it.  And guess what I’m learning?  If they weren’t, these guys wouldn’t be here either.

In  conclusion, the support, encouragement and congeniality from all the people I met in Ireland, pictured and not pictured, have left me burning a little brighter. The realization of a documentary about APL is far from a sure thing, but these folks just nudged it one step further along.

Thank you.

(PS I’m still showing everyone who will tolerate listening to me, J on my iPhone.  I mean everyone. ) 

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The iPhone, J & me

I love my iPhone.  It was the best Christmas gift ever, even better than the filing cabinet on Valentines day.  So, I am interrupting the princess report to mention I now have J on my iPhone.  Of course, many in the Community already know from twitter that I was interviewing Eric Iverson yesterday so that I can make a video to show at his J conference in July.

Thanks to Liz Giddons, I have live action shots of my first experience trying out J on a computer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am proud to report that the demographics on my Youtube channel have shifted in the last month to where the female readership has climbed to 16% up from many too many months at 2%. I don’t really understand why, but it sure makes me smile.

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Kx Princess Report #2

Where were we? Oh, yes, my commitment to Simon to find the K-Club in Straffan just outside of Dublin. And to arrive with something to show.

I flew in a day early to relax and see the city. This was enough time to learn that the Irish can give uncomfortably vague directions that miraculously work. For example, “It’s across the road,” did in fact turn out to be true.

The event was a Kx International Users conference. The tricky business about these conferences is that they are TOP SECRET. In fact, one of my new found friends revealed to me all kinds of interesting details about his personal life and when I asked if they were a secret, because… er… I am making a documentary… He said, no. BUT! What he had just explained to me about his work, now THAT, was absolutely secret.

Don’t get too excited. The only people who would understand any possible trade secret I may have learned, are the ultra-geek of geeks. I don’t expect to be kidnapped and held for ransom anytime soon. So, no kiss and tell. That’s how it goes. I can say that the spirit of innovation which began in the 1950’s with Dr Iverson at Harvard carries on. And simple is still the more difficult and best route. Even after all these years.

It was a real treat to finally meet Arthur Whitney. I expect that if I say too much right now, he’ll never talk to me again, which would be tragic. BUT! It was great. And Janet Lustgarten is the sharpest executive I’ve ever met. She’s an awesome role model for anyone, and is especially inspiring for women in tech. It was a pleasure to spend time with these folks.

Next time I’ll tell you about Carlos, Oleg, Peter, Pierre and Tisean. They share first prize for inspiring super ultra-core fans. What I mean by that, is when I ask myself, Why the heck am I doing this anyway? I just need to see their smiling faces and my batteries re-charge.

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The Princess goes to Straffan part 1

Perhaps ironically, the competition and barriers I am setting out to tackle make working on Wall Street look like summer camp. The stakes are much higher too because the currency is soul.

Documentary filmmaking is an uncertain, messy, un-businessy business and that’s why so many documentaries never get made. The sheer impossibility of the endeavor can grind a person down. And I was feeling it at the end of March; a little worn down; a little tired from the countless hours that have gone into this project since 2009; a little scared at the opportunity cost of my own labour gone; a little bit doubtful that I had anything to say.

It sounds like self-pity, but it’s actually just exhaustion.

Those of you who know me or have worked with me know that in the parlance of business, I’m a finisher. What this means is, that since I made a commitment to Simon Garland last summer, it doesn’t matter what obstacles were in the way. I would find the K Club, a castle in Ireland. And I would bring a show.

Now, I’m really glad and so I will tell you about why over the next couple of posts.

Thank you, everyone, for tuning in.  And may the Force be with you always.

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Posting from Paris on my iPhone

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I am having a lazy afternoon in Paris playing with my iPhone before venturing out for dinner with the infamous H&M. Lazy afternoon = sorting out how to get photos from my iPhone directly into this blog post, here. Voila! I adore WordPress!

It has be such an exciting week at the International Kx Conference in Dublin, I don’t know where to start with the story.

I brought a special short video divined from my research material and screened it for about 75 people. The piece was warmly received. Thank goodness. I needed the affirmation because I was feeling overwhelmed and a little discouraged. Documentary film is getting cut from all sides in Canada, grants are getting extremely scarce and at the same time tv airtime is going to reality shows. So even if you scrape together a show, there are fewer opportunities to show it. But never mind. I have received a transfusion of enthusiasm and we have cyberspace… So I am back to my cheery dgaf self.

And finally after all these years… I got to meet… Arthur Whitney. Now that was pretty awesome.

Ok. That’s enough 1 finger blogging From my iPhone. (I am blogging from my iPhone!!!!!)

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Brooks on Iverson

In October of 2011, Dr Fred Brooks agreed to talk to me about when he and Dr Kenneth E Iverson, the father of APL, shared an office at Harvard University in the 1950s.  So, I went to Chapel Hill in North Carolina, USA to speak with him.

Professor Dr Jan Prins, also from The University of North Carolina, assisted with the interview and he thought it would be interesting to know what it was like for Dr Iverson to receive the Turing award in 1979, 17 years after the publication of A Programming Language.  Here is the answer:

– corrected (Thank you Roger.  Again. )

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J, July and Solidarity

I’d like to start today by drawing your attention to what promises to be the APL Array Language Family event of the year – The J Community/Conference 2012 right here in Toronto, this July 23 & 24, 2012.  If you want to rub shoulders with Array Language Rock Stars, this is the conference to attend.

J conference July 23/24, 2012

Eric Iverson 2012

J Conference planning w/ Eric Iverson 2012

Further, 2012 is a special year because it is the 5oth anniversary of the publication of Dr. Kenneth Iverson’s seminal text A Programming Language which ultimately lead to his Turing Award, the “nobel prize of Computing”.  In honour of this important milestone, Eric Iverson and Liz Giddens, the J conference organizer, have asked that I let you know that you are specially invited attend the The J Conference Banquet to celebrate the larger legacy of Ken and his colleagues, even if you choose not to attend the conference. (Note: the early bird ticket price is up now, so I encourage you to get your ticket, while there are still tickets available).

What’s else is happening?

2011 dished out a little more than I could handle but that’s to be expected.  This is, however, why we’ve been so quiet this year on the blog. We’re in the back room, pushing things along quietly…  For example, the interview with Dr. Fred Brooks has been transcribed and the transcriptions are now under review by our subject matter experts.

I also applied for a fellowship grant from the ACM. I didn’t win the fellowship, however the application process connected me with the ACM History group.  And in spite of my extremely awkward and painful debut where I made the biggest public email faux pas I have ever made, the group is warm and welcoming.   Nathan Ensmenger, as one example, is generously sharing some of his articles with me. He has developed an interesting analysis of how computer programming transformed into a male dominated profession, when it didn’t start out this way.   I am writing about this documentary in the context of my own programming career for the ACM-W newsletter which is why I am looking at the research on gender in computing.

As a side note, working on this article is making me miss programming, which is a bit of a surprise.

Nathan Ensmenger also has an interest in film and contributed to Tops Secret Rosies, a documentary film about the women who did the ballistics calculations during WWI and were recruited to program the ENIAC – the Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer  in the 1940’2.  This experience gives him a special appreciation of the challenge set before us here with this documentary – how does one visualize an abstract construct like a computer programming language? 

This is just a taste of what’s going on behind the scenes.  Keep the faith. I hope to see everyone in July, if not sooner.

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Kenneth E Iverson – Toronto Memorial November 18, 2004

Well, hot dang! Youtube decided I get more time.  They sent me a note last week: Congratulations! You can upload videos longer than 15 mins.  This is GREAT news and I’m celebrating by uploading the synopsis of Ken Iverson’s Toronto memorial service I made back in 2004 when I first fell in love with my video camera.
 

 

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Lettow on Brooks honouring the 90th anniversary of KEI’s birth

As they say in rock and roll, “You can’t always get what you want… but you just might find you get what you need…”

When Ken Lettow asked me if he could swing down to North Carolina for my interview with Professor Fred Brooks,  I answered with a resounding and emphatic, “NO!”

You gotta love Ken.  Persistence is his middle name.  He then proceeded to convince me that he would not bring havoc to my film set and in fact, he would make himself useful.  And a short training session later…   I have a  sound engineer and set photographer all in one enthusiastic bundle  of a subject matter expertise.   In short, a much appreciated helping hand.

In honour of the 90th anniversary of Ken Iverson’s birth Ken Lettow sent out a wonderful account of our adventure to North Carolina to the J-Chat forum:

As [KEI and Prof Brooks] developed course material for the class,  Ken began to formalize the notation that came to be known as APL, the “the blackboard version” as Eugene McDonnell once so aptly put it.  Their collaboration ultimately resulted in the publication of two books, Ken Iverson’s “A Programming Language”,  in 1962 and “Automatic Data Processing” by Iverson and Brooks, published in 1963.  They also became lifelong friends during this period.

You can read Ken’s  full text here.  He’s also posted a great set of photos.

Happy holidays everyone.  May the Force be with you always.

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It’s APL’s Birthday! Or is it?

Last year we discovered that the first APL workspace was saved November 27, 1966 at 18.53.59. (GMT); the excitement of this momentous event pulling the guys away from home and the American Thanksgiving holiday.  Today we know that this evidence isn’t 100% the truth…  it’s more like 99.7% truth…  According to an eyewitness account from my dad history has been slightly amended… if only by a few seconds!

Should today be APL’s official birthday?

It just so happens that 2012 is the 50th anniversary of the publication of that one little book, “A Programming Language“. THE one little book, that Harvard deemed too small to launch its author, Kenneth E. Iverson into a tenure track position.  Harvard sent Ken packing! It wasn’t until much later that Ken’s work and this one little book was recognized by the world,  winning the Turing Award which is recognized as the “highest distinction in Computer science” and the “Nobel Prize of computing“.

The moral of this story?

Do it right and do it well.  Happy Birthday APL!

 

Many thanks to Rick Procter who reminded me about the significance of 2012 earlier this fall.

 

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J, K & NC (+ J Conference 2012)

I have a Stats exam next week and because I really should be studying, I thought I’d drop you a quick note.

First, a special announcement: the J folks are planning a conference RIGHT HERE in Toronto July 23rd  &24th 2012.  Come one! Come all!

The J-community has really stepped up to the plate in terms of financial and in-kind labour for this documentary project.  Let’s face it folks, unless you’re Fred Brooks, Arthur Whitney or Eric Iverson, or a dozen or so other stars, wanting to be in the documentary doesn’t do much for me.  

I expect you noticed I was in Chapel Hill last month.  Luckily, Roger Hui alerted me to the fact that The University of North Carolina has a programming gem in their freshman class who, at all of 18, has already made a splash in the J programming forums. Welcome Marshall Lochbaum, and his former high school math teacher Henry Rich (pictured above).

And of course, less obvious was my visit to NYC to see for myself what amazing work is going on at Kx.  If you haven’t watched the video of our Simon Garland in action (with moderator Tom Groenfeldt) you’re missing the cutting edge.

 

OK!  Off I go… Exam prep is really not that bad… or so I keep telling myself…

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Jaxon and me on Falkoff’s one liner

The following is adapted from email conversations with Greg Jaxon, a Compiler Engineer from Illinois, USA who studied at Syracuse University.  He is an active contributor to the APL LinkedIn online forum and it turns out he met my dad at Minowbrook in 1980. I needed a little help to conclude my, “Where were you…” miniseries, and Greg graciously stepped up to the plate.

My dad, incidentally, sends his regards from Manitoulin Island.  Though he still controls his farm house with his iPhone, he doesn’t miss the Internet connection. 

To give a little bit of context, I was born in 1965 to very young and idealistic parents who believed that the 60’s really were going to change things.  In 1966, IBM whisked my family off to NY, USA from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.  We subsequently moved to the Philadelphia, PA, USA area and ended up living in a small college town called Swarthmore.

Greg Jaxon writes:

One non-programming thing that has always intrigued me about the “APL community” and which has been formative for me politically and personally is our early and frequent use of consensus decision-making.  Perhaps your Dad could start that thread of the story, since (as I understand it) the group at Philadelphia took on this Quaker practice to form the exact definitions in the first APL implementation.

On Day 1 of the X3J10 APL standards effort the topic of voting came up right away. As that work progressed we used a few unorthodox voting schemes to tease out where consensus could be found – a lot of preference ranking and approval threshold measurement. It was clear that the intellectual descendants of the first 6 had the same passion for getting the hive mind to function optimally – to not marginalize the difficult corner opinions, not to cave in to majority rule. I’m convinced this is why APL is so very good – it hasn’t compromised on anything important – instead it found and fixed all the problems until no more could be found.  It’s not just good enough to get by…

The Minnowbrook conferences also echo this emphasis on cooperative agreement. Trade Secrets come out of their closets there – mostly I think out of the sheer joy of meeting other live humans who understand the topics (these are the uber-geeks of an already too geeky computing subculture).

This got my attention.   Swarthmore is in the heartland of Quaker territory.  I was educated by Quakers.  And Greg must have read Adin Falkoff’s, The Design of APL.

I belong to the generation uncomfortably sandwiched between the boomers and their children.  My attitude is formed more from the dress in black, hard core music generation, than the Flower Child generation but I still have strong ties to the Quakers and have remained connected to them up here in Canada.   To my good fortune, I started programming APL as a teen and unlike many of my peers, I’ve had a career from the get-go.  But still, the irreverence of my generation stuck.  In other words, I’m a little cynical.

The first time I read Adin Falkoff’s, The Design of APL, the line about Quaker Consensus jumped right out of the text.  (like: WHAT?  Where the hell does that come from? Consensus? At IBM?) And as I move through this project, I am learning a lot more about business, I have been chipping away at 50+ years of Computer History, and naturally, my gaze falls upon the history of IBM.  Which is also American corporate history.  And patent history.  An intellectual property law history.  I’m still pondering… What on earth is a reference to Quaker process doing in an IBM publication?

Greg responds:

My history lesson on this: Penn was a Flower Child of a famous military officer; he joined the Quakers who were emphatically not the Church of England, nor easily governed by any hierarchical law. Through consensus they sought God’s natural Laws for their community. Penn acquired his North American woods to settle the King’s debt to his late father. But by the time he got with the English aristocracy programme, his Woods were full of Quaker hippies.

For many years he sent governors and magistrates and others to try to collect rents or taxes, and the resident Friends politely declined to impose these on themselves. So your Quakers were the original American libertarians struggling to understand God’s intention for human Law.

To find Harvard mathematicians (arguably in search of much the same kind of revelation) adopt this practice, is interesting.  To see it grow into APL, itself a quaint minority language with an uncannily natural place near the heart of Computer Science’s new fascination with parallel execution models, cooperating independent processes, and clean data abstraction,  … is perhaps a recurrent story in the history of ideas. Your Dad’s “shared variables” ideas combine “message passing” with “shared memory” approaches to parallelism, a synthesis sorely missing in modern parallel languages.

There… my contribution to a historical explanation, I can cite “Conceived in Liberty” by historian Murray Rothbard for this summary of the Quaker colonies.

Wow.  Now THAT gives me a lot to think about.  On this crazy filmmaking journey, I’m paying careful attention to the stories we tell ourselves, about ourselves, our culture and “progress”.  And by we, I also mean people, not just us.

And, sadly, this is the one year anniversary of Adin Falkoff’s death, the man who wrote those words about Quaker Consensus at IBM in 1973.

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Enough said

I’ve said enough on the matter. For now.

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This is not a film: Storytelling X.1

Oh. And today, I’m not kidding.

I hope you aren’t disappointed. I really do have a legacy to live up to, here.  No shit. I’m so proud of our quirky little community, and as I said in the film synopsis, I plan to tell everyone about it. What else is a woman who faced, first hand, the Iverson challenge to do?  Parrot back what’s been done before?  No way. Trail blaze, buddy.

On that note, I’m completely excited to report that I’m speaking on a hot panel at a super cool conference called Storytelling X.1.

Digital Storytelling X.1 is a one day symposium exploring how digital technologies are changing forms of storytelling today.

Ah, the story and its relationship to money!  Everyone wants to hear about money. It’s the math that everyone cares about!  So, that’s what I’ll talk about. Isn’t it fitting for an Array language storyteller!

And I’ll share the epiphany I had at hot docs after listening to Frank Rose. (Ok, shaking his hand was a huge thrill!)

It is the inspiring,  brilliant and beautiful Siobhan O’Flynn who is responsible for getting me to Storytelling X.1, follow her on twitter, you won’t be disappointed. @sioflynn.

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Please vote for the APL documentary film logo!

Which logo do you prefer?  The choice is yours. The logo with the most votes by Friday Feb 1, 2013 will become the official film logo.  The author of this creation is our fabulous designer, Cris Jaw.

NOTE: You may click on the images below to enlarge them.  You may comment if you view the poll directly on polldaddy.com.

Logo in development

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APL@50 York University – Nov 1, 2012

Ken Iverson with Jean & Eric Iverson & Roger Hui.
June 11, 1998

Right around the time the Silverman Brothers were wrestling with a clandestine copy of the 1966 APL/360 source code, York University bestowed Dr. Iverson with an honorary degree.

Continuing the tradition at the end of this month,  York, in collaboration with its infant Computer History Museum, will host a day long lecture style event aptly titled APL@50 in celebration of the 50th anniversary which marks the publication of Iverson’s seminal book, A Programming Language.  I hope to see you there.

This is a free event & is open to the public.
November 1, 2012,
Doors open at 9am – 4pm See Shedule

York University, Toronto
Lecture Hall B of the Lassonde Building

Please consult the York University maps for the public transit and driving directions as well as for the location of the Lassonde Building.

 

 

 

 

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Gorbets on technology in the hands of an artist

After graduation at the Canadian Film Centre in 2004, one of my teachers, Susan Gorbet came up to me and said, “Maybe we can hang out. You know.  Be friends.”  Double-Plus WOW.

Matt Gorbet, who I like to think of as the front man of the dynamic duo, husband and wife team behind Gorbet Design is auditioning for TED!  Frankly, his audition in Tech Makes Art Come to Life  reminds me of why I do what I do.  Inspiration in its purest form.

Please watch.  Please think.  Please vote for this idea worth spreading: Tech Makes Art Come to Life

PS. Matt studied at the MIT Media Lab, which is only one of his glorious accomplishments.   Oh… and guess what? He’s Canadian…

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